TBI & SCI Resources

A Leading Cause of Disability

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health problem in the United States. Each year, traumatic brain injuries contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. In fact, TBI is a contributing factor to a third (30.5%) of all injury-related deaths in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control estimate that approximately 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. Each year, TBIs contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. A 2008 study in the journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation found that largest improvement for survivors of TBI is in the first year after injury and getting back into the community can be expected. But even in what are deemed full, successful recoveries, clients can have problems with memory and integrating too many stimuli at once and full intellectual and executive function can be difficult to recover. However, a client’s success is as individual as their rehabilitation experience with some clients experiencing greater improvement than others. Finding the right rehabilitation program and accessing supportive resources provides the greatest opportunity for long-term success.

Varies in Severity and Time to Recovery

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Not all blows or jolts to the head result in a TBI. The severity of a TBI may range from “mild,” i.e., a brief change in mental status or consciousness, to “severe,” i.e., an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia after the injury.

TBI can cause a wide range of functional short- or long-term changes affecting thinking, sensation, language, or emotions.  Thinking (i.e., memory and reasoning); Sensation (i.e., touch, taste, and smell); Language (i.e., communication, expression, and understanding); and Emotion (i.e., depression, anxiety, personality changes, aggression, acting out, and social inappropriateness). TBI can also cause epilepsy and increase the risk for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other brain disorders that become more prevalent with age.

While there is no one size fits all solution, there are interventions that can be effective to help limit the impact of brain injury. These measures include primary prevention, early management, and treatment. For some, recovery can take weeks or months. For others, it is a lifelong process. At TASS, our team of rehabilitation experts works to help our clients maximize their skills, independence and quality of life regardless of their recovery prognosis.

Contact TASS

We would love to talk to you and answer your questions about referrals, directions, office hours or to schedule a tour. To talk to TASS, please contact us by calling 985-370-0323. Email us at suzanne@tassbraininjury.com or fill out the contact form below. We look forward to hearing from you!

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TASS Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center

"Together Achieving Self Sufficiency"

42215 Pleasant Ridge Ext

Ponchatoula, LA 70454

(985) 370-0323

suzanne@tassbraininjury.com

 

Copyright © 2017 - TASS Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health problem in the United States. Each year, traumatic brain injuries contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. In fact, TBI is a contributing factor to a third (30.5%) of all injury-related deaths in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control estimate that approximately 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. Each year, TBIs contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. A 2008 study in the journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation found that largest improvement for survivors of TBI is in the first year after injury and getting back into the community can be expected. But even in what are deemed full, successful recoveries, clients can have problems with memory and integrating too many stimuli at once and full intellectual and executive function can be difficult to recover. However, a client’s success is as individual as their rehabilitation experience with some clients experiencing greater improvement than others. Finding the right rehabilitation program and accessing supportive resources provides the greatest opportunity for long-term success.

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